Perspiration is usually a good thing. Our ability to sweat makes it possible for our bodies to regulate its temperature, because the sweat cools the skin and then has a further cooling effect as it evaporates.

The ability to perspire keeps the body from overheating when conditions are hot, such as while exercising or being outside on a sunny day. Sweat glands increase production as the body temperature increases.

However, excessive sweating that is not related to heat or exercise indicates an abnormal condition called hyperhidrosis. Let’s explore why overactive sweating happens and what can be done about it.

What Is Excessive Sweating?

Hyperhidrosis is a condition that is characterized by heavy sweating without reason. If you sweat so much that the perspiration soaks through your clothes without cause, then you may have hyperhidrosis.

The sweating can be so severe that it drips from everywhere, including your underarms, hands, feet, and face. Persons with hyperhidrosis experience these symptoms at least once a week while they’re awake. 

Hyperhidrosis can be embarrassing for those who suffer from the condition, which include men and women and even adolescents.

How Is Hyperhidrosis Diagnosed? 

A doctor will evaluate your condition to determine whether you are suffering from hyperhidrosis or if something else is causing your excessive sweating. The physician will take your medical history, and you’ll be asked to answer a series of questions about the symptoms you’re experiencing.

The doctor may also order tests. These might include testing the blood and urine, and the lab results will help determine the cause. Sweat tests may include an iodine-starch test, thermoregulatory sweat test, and/or a skin conductance test. 

Causes of Heavy Sweating

Primary hyperhidrosis is the most common type of this condition. This is caused by overactive nerves that are triggering your sweat glands even though there is no stimulus, such as exercise, a hot environment, or stress. 

Secondary hyperhidrosis isn’t as common as the primary form, and this type is caused by an underlying separate medical condition. Such conditions can include diabetes, thyroid issues, cancer, or infection. 

Treatment of Hyperhidrosis

If you are diagnosed with hyperhidrosis, your doctor will first try the least-invasive method, which is to prescribe special antiperspirant. If this doesn’t help, the physician may offer to treat it surgically, which is done by disabling the problematic nerves or disabling the sweat glands themselves. 

However, there are revolutionary noninvasive treatments that are proving to be very successful in controlling heavy sweating. Dr. Iorio has extensive training on hyperhidrosis and can create a treatment plan that’s right for you.

Excessive underarm sweating can be specially treated with Botox® for hyperhidrosis. Botox is injected under the arm and blocks the chemical messenger that controls sweat glands in that area.

The Botox is administered in less than a minute, and it is injected just below the skin’s surface. The patient will experience noticeable results within two to four days following treatment, and full effects are recognized within two weeks.

Who Can Help Me With My Sweating Problem?

Enduring hyperhidrosis is unnecessary. A patient receiving Botox injections for hyperhidrosis can expect to be free of excessive sweating under the arms for up to six months.

Contact us today to request an appointment by calling our Colts Neck location at (732) 780-9191 or our Brick location at (732) 458-7400. You can also fill out our online appointment request form. We look forward to helping you regain your confidence again!

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